gedankentank.com

Hi, I'm Matthias. I work at Intuity Media Lab where I'm handcrafting interfaces and helping others to shape new ideas. I enjoy music, tinkering with web stuff, nonsense and people that don't take life seriously. You can talk to me on Twitter. This tank is full of random things I stumble across and enjoy. Stay hungry, stay foolish - never settle.

02.09.2014

The Web is going to get faster in the very near future. … It won’t be because some…

The Web is going to get faster in the very near future.

It won’t be because some giant company created something great, though they probably have. The Web will be getting faster very soon because a small group of developers saw a problem and decided to solve it for all of us.

The story of the Picture element isn’t just an interesting tale of Web developers working together to make the Web a…

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28.04.2014

Velocity is a jQuery plugin that re-implements $.animate() to produce 20 times the performance

Velocity is a jQuery plugin that re-implements $.animate() to produce 20 times the performance (making Velocity faster than CSS animations) while including several new features to improve animation workflow.

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17.04.2014

No tool will save you from that. None. Everything will be out of control as soon as it’s scaled to…

No tool will save you from that. None. Everything will be out of control as soon as it’s scaled to more than a prototype, because control isn’t even 10% about the tools, but awareness about the impact of hundreds of small decisions, which requires real knowledge about the subject domain. It’s about forging and sharpening that awareness through a mentality that embraces constant refactoring, while…

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14.04.2014

Putting humans in the front and humans at the end. And using technology as an augmentation is key…

Putting humans in the front and humans at the end. And using technology as an augmentation is key to the web becoming a useful tool not a fetishistic device.

Dave Snowden in his talk How not to manage complexity @ State of the Net 2013

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14.01.2014

Blue sky thinking about SVG and angular

It’s been a while since I created RaphCon, a little mashup library based on jQuery and Raphael.js, that let’s you create and animate vector icons (See the vector icons on shuttlestudio.defor a little demo). With the recent hype around Web Components and…

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12.01.2014

How coffee changed our world | Quote from “The Lost World of the London Coffeehouse” on publicdomainreview.orgView Post

How coffee changed our world | Quote from “The Lost World of the London Coffeehouse” on publicdomainreview.org

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08.01.2014

Benjamin Bratton: “What’s Wrong with TED Talks?”

Benjamin Bratton: “What’s Wrong with TED Talks?” and “Design as immunisation”.

Stumbled across a talk by Benjamin Bratton that shares an interesting perspective on TED. To me it’s also a stimulating comment on the increasing bubble of design-thinking, placebo-innovation and increasing shallowness of social-media.

“Perhaps the…

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30.12.2013

It’s much more possible that other countries around the world who are truly indignant about…

It’s much more possible that other countries around the world who are truly indignant about the breaches of their privacy security will band together and create alternatives, either in terms of infrastructure, or legal regimes that will prevent the…

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30.12.2013

But why do we need “smart” watches or face-mounted computers like Google Glass? They have radically…

But why do we need “smart” watches or face-mounted computers like Google Glass? They have radically different hardware and software needs than smartphones, yet they don’t offer much more utility. They’re also always with you, but not significantly more…

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17.12.2013

How did JavaScript kick Java’s ass?

Stumbled across a tweet from Brendan Eich today that featured a link to an interview about JavaScript back from 2008. Studying the past can lead to interesting things so I decided to read along. One paragraph caught my interest…

“We saw Java as the…

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13.12.2013

Leaving tumblr…

Leaving tumblr

Today I’m leaving tumblr. It’s been a hard decision but I think its time to move on. I still believe tumblr is an amazing and inspiring platform but there are three main reasons for saying goodbye.

  1. It has become increasingly hard to export my data from…

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10.12.2013

If we really care about the next generation becoming hackers and makers, not just consumers, we need to reject Apple’s bullshit, reject Micorsoft’s (decreasingly relevant) bullshit, and focus on open systems. This doesn’t have to be Android. Ubuntu Phone looks promising, Firefox OS might not be more Mozilla vaporware, and Jolla looks incredibly promising.
– Jason Lewis - http://decomplecting.org/blog/2013/12/09/apple-the-obstacle-to-americas-future/ (via https://twitter.com/mbanzi/status/410283061721694208)

07.12.2013

Hunter-gatherers have nothing akin to school. Adults believe that children learn by observing, exploring, and playing, and so they afford them unlimited time to do that.

The Sudbury Valley School and a hunter-gatherer band are very different from one another in many ways, but they are similar in providing what I see as the essential conditions for optimising children’s natural abilities to educate themselves. They share the social expectation (and reality) that education is children’s responsibility, not something that adults do to them, and they provide unlimited freedom for children to play, explore, and pursue their own interests. They also provide ample opportunities to play with the tools of the culture; access to a variety of caring and knowledgeable adults, who are helpers, not judges; and free age-mixing among children and adolescents (age-mixed play is more conducive to learning than play among those who are all at the same level). Finally, in both settings, children are immersed in a stable, moral community, so they acquire the values of the community and a sense of responsibility for others, not just for themselves.
Peter Gray - The play deficit (via Isaiah Saxon)

24.11.2013

The practice of taking an intentional break from technology and civilization is probably as old as technology and civilization. But it seems increasingly urgent now, in an era when the Internet—and thus most of the planet—is as close as an iPhone. We go to seek waldeinsamkeit, as the poet Ralph Waldo Emerson described it—the feeling of being alone in the woods.

The phone isn’t the problem. The problem is us—our inability to step away from email and games and inessential data, our inability to look up, be it at an alpine lake or at family members. We won’t be able to get away from it all for very much longer. So it’s vitally important that each of us learns how to live with a persistent connection, everywhere we go, whether it’s in the wilderness or at a dinner party.
– Mat Honan on Wired.com Can’t Get Away From It All? The Problem Isn’t Technology — It’s You (via Do Lectures)

10.11.2013

Technological Disobedience

Technological Disobedience – I really like this term. Originally coined by Ernesto Oroza to describe the inventive talent of Cubans during a sad but ingeniously creative period of Cuban history.

“People think beyond the normal capacities of an object, and try to surpass the limitations that it imposes on itself.”
Ernesto Oroza on MotherboardTV

“The accumulation of products led workers to radically question industrial processes and mechanisms. They started looking at objects not with the eyes of an
engineer but those of an artisan. Every object could potentially be repaired or reused, even in a different context from its original design. Accumulation separated the object from the Western intent and lifecycle it was destined for. This is technological disobedience.”
Ernestor Oroza on mkshft.org

“After opening, breaking, repairing, and using them so often at their convenience, the makers ultimately disregarded the signs that make occidental objects a unity, a closed identity. Cubans do not fear the emanating authority that brands like Sony, Swatch, or even NASA, command. If something is broken, it will be fixed—somehow. If it could even be conceived as usable to repair other objects, they might as well save it, either in parts or in its entirety. A new future awaits.“
Ernestor Oroza on mkshft.org

Opening things up. Manipulating things. Turning things upside down. Using objects in ways the original creators not even dreamed of. This is the kind of spirit we should be teaching kids at our schools. Program or be programmed!

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